hughbiquitous

All over the place with Hugh Williams

A Thanksgiving Postmortem: Things to Remember for 2013

1. Buy turkey in July. Begin thawing on dashboard of car in direct sunlight to ensure it’s thawed by Thanksgiving.

2. Brine the bird. Please.

3. Stretch police tape around kitchen. If you ain’t cookin’, you ain’t in there. And let’s be clear: if I’m cookin’, you ain’t cookin’.

4. You can make way more dressing with drippings than you can by cooking stuffing inside the bird. Place same recipe in casserole dish. When turkey is done, pour drippings (yep, all of ‘em) all over the dressing and mix well. Pack down a bit, cover, and bake, stirring every so often so the outer bits don’t get toasted.

5. Make a lot. For all the effort it takes, get some mileage out of your leftovers.

6. Dress in layers with short sleeves underneath. Thanksgiving in Atlanta is never cold and the kitchen is always hot and needs the windows open.

7. The Thanksgiving Day Parade is always ridiculous. See if you can get everybody to believe it’s been canceled.

8. Mashed potatoes: happened to have heavy cream in the fridge for something else, so we used what was left for the mashed potatoes, along with an unquestionably unhealthy quantity of butter. Life-changing. Continue this practice.

9. The disposable roasting pan rubbed too hard on the oven rack when we slid it in and it started leaking. Fortunately we had a second one on hand. Remember that for future reference.

10. Use a long, skinny knife to dissect the bird, not a wide chef’s knife: need to be able to rotate the blade and a wide blade makes that difficult. Then use the electric knife to slice the breast meat.

11. Make sure to have extra turkey gravy for leftovers. Didn’t have any more today, so I used brown gravy. Better than no gravy at all, but turkey gravy is better still.

A Thanksgiving Postmortem: Things to Remember for 2013

1. Buy turkey in July. Begin thawing on dashboard of car in direct sunlight to ensure it’s thawed by Thanksgiving.

2. Brine the bird. Please.

3. Stretch police tape around kitchen. If you ain’t cookin’, you ain’t in there. And let’s be clear: if I’m cookin’, you ain’t cookin’.

4. You can make way more dressing with drippings than you can by cooking stuffing inside the bird. Place same recipe in casserole dish. When turkey is done, pour drippings (yep, all of ‘em) all over the dressing and mix well. Pack down a bit, cover, and bake, stirring every so often so the outer bits don’t get toasted.

5. Make a lot. For all the effort it takes, get some mileage out of your leftovers.

6. Dress in layers with short sleeves underneath. Thanksgiving in Atlanta is never cold and the kitchen is always hot and needs the windows open.

7. The Thanksgiving Day Parade is always ridiculous. See if you can get everybody to believe it’s been canceled.

8. Mashed potatoes: happened to have heavy cream in the fridge for something else, so we used what was left for the mashed potatoes, along with an unquestionably unhealthy quantity of butter. Life-changing. Continue this practice.

9. The disposable roasting pan rubbed too hard on the oven rack when we slid it in and it started leaking. Fortunately we had a second one on hand. Remember that for future reference.

10. Use a long, skinny knife to dissect the bird, not a wide chef’s knife: need to be able to rotate the blade and a wide blade makes that difficult. Then use the electric knife to slice the breast meat.

11. Make sure to have extra turkey gravy for leftovers. Didn’t have any more today, so I used brown gravy. Better than no gravy at all, but turkey gravy is better still.

Since the economics of civil lawsuits, especially patent lawsuits, prevent most cases against small defendants from ever getting near a court, the potential cost to society of issuing an invalid patent is massive.

If someone threatens your small business with a patent lawsuit, it doesn’t matter whether the patent is valid. Because for you to prove that it’s invalid would take far more time and money than you probably have. The only sensible course of action, the path taken by almost everyone threatened by patent litigation, is to settle with the patent-holder as quickly as possible for whatever amount of money they demand.

In practice, therefore, an issued patent is a valid patent as long as the patent-holder doesn’t try to sue anyone too large. (And even the largest corporations usually settle.)

Why software patents are not fixable – Marco.org

Britain's Dim and Grim Carbon Fetish »

Here’s what the Brits are saying about their “green energy” policy-makers:

I’m afraid we are in the hands of very dangerous children, upon whose deranged wishful thinking a large part of our country’s future depends.

The fact is that so-called “green energy” is expensive to the point that only the richest of the rich can afford to heat their homes.

As the London Times’ Matt Ridley said:

The future belongs to countries that can get their electricity, heat and fuel supplied as cheaply and reliably as possible. That is the priority, not the carbon fetish.

A lack of mental focus is the reason you’ve got a dozen half-finished projects lying around the house. Dabbling in many things is easy; focusing on one is difficult. But great men of history knew that one of the keys of success was the power of concentration and the ability to hone in on a singular aim and see it through to completion.

Your wandering mind not only keeps you from achieving greatness, it also makes you less happy as well. Psychologists at Harvard University recently conducted a study on the relationship between our activities and our happiness… they found that people were happiest during sex and exercise (activities in which we are fully present in our physical bodies!), while those engaged in commuting, working, and grooming felt the least chipper. But what was really interesting was the finding that not only were 47% of people daydreaming at any given time, but that the more a person’s mind wandered, the less happy they were. Focusing on the activity at hand increased a persons happiness. Of course some daydreaming is quite healthy for our minds and our creativity. But there is something to be said for giving yourself over to something-mind, body, and soul.

Become Fully Present as a Man

Cell phones are no more carcinogenic than coffee

Phil Plait:

I’ve read about lots of studies showing no link at all between cell phones and health issues (besides quadrupling your odds of a car accident if you drive while using your phone), so my reaction was one of fair skepticism. I’d be surprised if a strong connection had been found.

… Basically, the WHO put cell phones into the Group 2B category, meaning they are “possibly carcinogenic to humans”. Aiiiieee! Sounds scary… except that word “possibly”, it turns out, needs to be understood a little more quantitatively…You may also wish to note what other things are categorized as Group 2B possible carcinogens, including gasoline, pickled vegetables, and (GASP!) coffee.

“We cannot mingle with the splendours we see. But all the leaves of the New Testament are rustling with the rumour that it will not always be so. Some day, God willing, we shall get in. When human souls have become as perfect in voluntary obedience as the inanimate creation is in its lifeless obedience, then they will put on its glory, or rather that greater glory of which Nature is only the first sketch.”

– C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

“If our religion is something objective, then we must never avert our eyes from those elements in it which seem puzzling or repellent; for it will be precisely the puzzling or the repellent which conceals what we do not yet know and need to know.”

C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory